Another Bloody Meeting?

Another Bloody Meeting!

‘The convergence of alternative methodologies through blue-sky thinking should leverage business action-items for robust solutions.’

or, in other words…

Take a look at these ideas to make your meetings more productive…..

 

1)         Changing Places

If you have regular meetings with the same group of people, have you noticed where they sit?  Do they have the same seat every meeting, which they hold on to for dear life: I call this ‘The Three Bears Syndrome’ (Who’s sitting in MY seat!)

The problem with this, is that it also means that the mindset of individuals will be unlikely to alter. So, if you’ve quieter people in the group, swapping seating can help to balance out contributions.

Think back to meetings, where there’s little movement in the room: as soon as you change your posture or position around the table, you’ll also be thinking more freely.  If there’s a possibility to agree to do this as a group, even better.

2)         Anchor it

Many meetings would have agendas handed out beforehand but copy the contents on to a larger flip chart.  Now, when someone interrupts with an unrelated matter do this:

a)    Walk over to the flip chart, point to the matter you’re discussing and say ‘How is this issue related to the one here?’

b)    The speaker will then rephrase so that they connect the two or will retract.  You can always ‘Park’ it (see below).

c)    The next time, someone intervenes with an issue that might not be pertinent, walk over to the flip chart again, and ask the same question.

d)    After about 3 repeats, you’ll find that as soon as you lift the pen and look at the chart, they’ll automatically be prompted to reconsider statements to fit in with the agenda.

3)         Use Parking Places

This is immensely useful for when you think the meeting is being side-railed.  It’s simply a flip chart with issues, questions or comments that you need to come back to.  You’ll less likely to have A Monopoliser taking over the discussion, if they think you’ll get back to them.  These might be the basis of ‘Any Other Business’ or meetings that are best on a one-to-one.

4)        Decide on your feet

Meetings where people stand up, are shorter than those when all parties are sitting.   On average, standing meetings last for 10 minutes.  Sitting ones last – well gawd knows – the mug with the stop watch fell asleep before it finished.

One Accountancy practice for which I worked had a table that was waist-height and no chairs in their meeting room.  Meetings were short and succinct.  The fact that people can move easier around the table means that status games around the table are dissolved and decisions made more cohesively.  You may still want chairs, but round tables also help in more participative discussions and having people refer to decisions or process pinned onto flip charts hanging off the wall, means that participants will be more animated and the meeting will have greater energy.

The result:  everyone’s on the same page, and can, therefore, make a decision – other than when the next meeting should be…

We’re gonna be out there bumpin’ and thumpin’
(Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer on launch plans for Windows Vista)

and lastly…There might still be misunderstandings but they’ll be less likely to happen if you speak plain English!!!

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